Pelosi announces impeachment inquiry against Trump

%28Photo+courtesy+of+Gabe++Skidmore+%28CC+BY-SA+2.0%29%29+Democrat+Nancy+Pelosi%2C+while+at+first+was+hesitant%2C+decided+to+launch+an+impeachment+inquiry+against+President+Trump+on+Sept.+24.
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Pelosi announces impeachment inquiry against Trump

(Photo courtesy of Gabe  Skidmore (CC BY-SA 2.0)) Democrat Nancy Pelosi, while at first was hesitant, decided to launch an impeachment inquiry against President Trump on Sept. 24.

(Photo courtesy of Gabe Skidmore (CC BY-SA 2.0)) Democrat Nancy Pelosi, while at first was hesitant, decided to launch an impeachment inquiry against President Trump on Sept. 24.

(Photo courtesy of Gabe Skidmore (CC BY-SA 2.0)) Democrat Nancy Pelosi, while at first was hesitant, decided to launch an impeachment inquiry against President Trump on Sept. 24.

(Photo courtesy of Gabe Skidmore (CC BY-SA 2.0)) Democrat Nancy Pelosi, while at first was hesitant, decided to launch an impeachment inquiry against President Trump on Sept. 24.

By Chris Rysz, Opinion Editor

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House Speaker Nancy Pelosi (D-Calif.), announced the beginning of a formal impeachment inquiry against President Trump for violating the U.S. Constitution on Tuesday, Sept. 24. 

Speaker Pelosi, who originally was hesitant on impeachment, explained her concerns with President Trump’s July phone call with the Ukrainian President.  

“This week, the President has admitted to asking the President of Ukraine to take actions which would benefit him politically,” Speaker Pelosi said in a press conference. “The actions of the Trump presidency revealed the dishonorable fact of the President’s betrayal of his oath of office, betrayal of our national security and betrayal of the integrity of our elections.”

Before the impeachment inquiry, there was a whistleblower complaint on Aug. 12, but it wasn’t originally filed. Then, the Washington Post broke that the complaint had to do with a July 25 phone call between President Trump and the Ukrainian president. The White House, in an attempt to defend the phone call, released the transcript of the phone call. According to the transcript, Trump asked the Ukrainian president to “look into” allegations of former V.P. Joe Biden stopping a prosecutor from investigating his son, Hunter, who worked with a Ukrainian company when Joe was Vice President. 

Around the time of the original phone call, U.S. foreign aid for Ukraine was momentarily withheld, which rose suspicions from Democrats about Trump using the aid to get Ukraine to look into the Bidens. President Trump responded to the suspicions by saying he wants European countries to contribute more to foreign military aid, mainly for Ukraine’s conflict with Russia. 

“I want other countries to put up money,” President Trump said according to NBC News. “I think it’s unfair that we put up the money. Then people called me and said, ‘Oh, let it go,’ and I let it go.” 

AP American Government and Politics teacher Beth Vaknin said she thinks this inquiry will force current presidential candidates to take a stand, thus having impeachment becoming a prominent 2020 issue. Vaknin also said she believes it will affect how D.C. runs.

“The impeachment inquiry will slow things down in D.C. and divide the nation, but it may do a lot to reign in the executive branch which hasn’t been following the rules,” Vaknin said.