Students face extreme school expectations

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Students face extreme school expectations

Italian teacher Michael Micucci and junior Tommy Drago shake hands.

Italian teacher Michael Micucci and junior Tommy Drago shake hands.

Lara Delvecchio

Italian teacher Michael Micucci and junior Tommy Drago shake hands.

Lara Delvecchio

Lara Delvecchio

Italian teacher Michael Micucci and junior Tommy Drago shake hands.

By Gabrielle Kesh, Features Editor

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It’s 10 p.m., and a student has just gotten home from a track meet. They still have not eaten dinner, showered or started their homework. They look on google classroom and are reminded of their five tests the next day. The student pulls out their binders and notebooks to start studying. When they are finished, it’s 3 a.m. Their alarm will go off in three hours.

As every school year starts, students and teachers find themselves struggling to understand how to please each other. Students get frustrated by their hectic weeks and piles of assignments. Teachers can’t comprehend why their students don’t do homework, can’t study for tests and fall asleep in class. It is the lack of understanding of each other’s expectations that leaves both teachers and student’s confused and irritated.

“I want my teachers to challenge me, but I also want them to understand when I have things going on outside of school and can’t meet every deadline,” junior Danielle Williams said.

Although students try to commit themselves to many activities, teachers say that school has to be a priority. Since a large amount of work has to be completed by a certain deadline, it is crucial that students stay organized so they do not fall behind. Teachers say that they will be accommodating at times, but will not make the acceptance of late work a habit.

“If a student can’t get work done because something critical is happening outside of school, I will tell them to get it to me the next day,” Spanish teacher Gilbert Alvarez said. “I’ll work with them as long as they work with me.”

Students and teachers both have a lot on their plates, so it is essential for them to maintain clear guidelines of expectations. They shouldn’t be at war but should fight the battle of high school together.

 

Behind the Byline
Gabrielle Kesh, Features Editor
Gabrielle Kesh works for The Wessex Wire. Tennis is her favorite sport and she plays on the school team every fall. Gabrielle loves shopping, hanging out with her friends and taking Buzzfeed quizzes. She also dedicates a large portion of her time to looking at memes. Her favorite show is Glee which she has watched a total of five times. Fun Fact: Gabrielle's favorite Glee character is Blaine.
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