Returning to school serves as a wake-up call, both to teachers and students

Students+crowd+the+entrance%2C+excited+to+see+their+friends+and+talk+to+them+before+class%2C+something+they+were+unable+to+do+last+year.

Photo by Lindsey Leitner

Students crowd the entrance, excited to see their friends and talk to them before class, something they were unable to do last year.

With the switch back from virtual and hybrid learning to full-time in person instruction, students feel the need to re-learn how to complete their formerly normal everyday actions.

As in every situation, there are positives and negatives to being back. Some of these positives, according to a majority of students, include being in a school setting.

“I like being in a good environment and being able to get stuff done,” a student said.

Additionally, the social aspect makes in-person learning much more appealing. Getting to spend every day having face-to-face interactions with friends makes it easier to get through the monotonous school day.

However, after going an entire year without waking up as early, taking tests in person, being face-to-face with their teachers and seeing friends and peers all day, students struggle to return to this routine.

While the majority of students prefer being in person, they also dislike the assumption from teachers that they still receive the same education benefits last year as they would have in a normal school year.

“It’s tough to readjust and use material from classes I took last year that I don’t really remember anything about,” one student said.

“It has taken a large physical and mental toll,” another student said.